Health Effects

Radon Health Effects

RADON AND YOUR HEALTH

Each year, thousands of Americans fall victim to lung cancer. Smoking, radon, and secondhand smoke are the primary causes and each can contribute to your lung cancer risk. Lung cancer can be treated, however survival rates are poor. Only 11 to 15 percent of those afflicted will live beyond five years from the time of diagnosis.

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National Cancer Institute's 2010 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)

Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. It is responsible for 21,000 lung cancer deaths in the US each year. As radon decays, it produces polonium by-products that give off harmful alpha radiation. These by-products attach to dust particles in the air that are easily inhaled into the lungs. Once inside the lungs, the alpha radiation causes DNA damage to healthy tissue that can initiate tumor growth.

RADON EXPOSURE AND CANCER RISK

Not everyone who is exposed to elevated levels of radon will develop lung cancer. The amount of time between exposure and the onset of the disease may be many years. Your chances of getting lung cancer from radon are related to:

  • The radon level in your home
  • The length of time you live in the home
  • If you are a smoker or have ever smoked

Radon Risk for Smokers

Radon Risk for Non-Smokers

RADON IS A LUNG CANCER RISK THAT CAN BE ELIMINATED

The facts are clear. Radon raises the risk of lung cancer. Fortunately, radon is something that can be easily and affordably removed from homes. A radon system should be designed and installed by a certified radon professional to insure that it complies with standards established by industry experts and state and local radon regulations.

WHAT IS pCi/L?

It means Picocuries per liter, which is a unit for measuring radioactive concentrations.

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